Bimodal Histogram- Open Middle Problem

Directions: Using the integers 1 to 9, create a data list that produces the following graph.  (You may use an integer more than once)

Bimodal-histogram.png

What do you notice about the graph?  How does that help you with the problem?

Justify why your list works.

Are there any other data lists that produce the same graph?  Provide an example.

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2-Way Table Frequencies- Open Middle Problem

Directions: Using the numbers 1 to 9, fill in the boxes to create a 2-way frequency table that follows the following guidelines (you may only us a number once):

  1. The total number of kids interviewed is 242.
  2. The number of kids who like both superheroes is half the number of kids who like neither.
  3. Superman is the most popular among the kids interviewed.

Two Category Data Table.PNG

 

What percent of the kids like both superheroes?

What percent of the kids dislike both superheroes?

How much more popular is Superman than Captain America?

Box Plots 2- Open Middle Problem

Directions: Using the integers 1 to 9, create a data set of 6 or more values that generates the same quartiles as {1,3,3,7,9}, but with a Median of 6 instead.  You may use a number more than once.

Box Plot Change.PNG

 

What patterns did you notice while working on this problem?

What strategies did you theorize you needed?

Were any of them solutions?

What strategy  did you find?

Can this strategy be used to change Q1 or Q3?

 

What if your data set was to only have 5 numbers?

Box Plots- Open Middle Problem

Directions: Using the integers 0 to 9, create a data set that will produce the following Box Plot.  You may use the numbers more than once.

boxplot.png

 

What is the least amount of points you need to create the graph?

What is the greatest amount of points you need to create the graph?

Can you have the same amount of points but different values?  (Could 1,1,3,3,5,5,7,7,9,9 product the same box plot as 1,1,3,4,5,5,6,7,9,9?) If so, provide an example.